Rogers, Yvonne

Yvonne Rogers with Helen Sharp (center) and Jennifer Preece (right) at the ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, April 28 – May 3, 2007, in San Jose, CA.
Yvonne Rogers with Helen Sharp (center) and Jennifer Preece (right) at the ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, April 28 – May 3, 2007, in San Jose, CA.

Yvonne Rogers is the director of The University College London Interaction Centre (UCLIC), the leading UK Centre of Excellence in Human-Computer Interaction teaching and research. She also teaches courses as a Professor of Interaction Design and serves as a deputy head of the Computer Science Department at UCL. Her research interests include ubiquitous computing and interaction design, particularly how to design interactive technologies that can augment and extend everyday learning and work activities. Central to her work is a critical stance toward how visions, theories, and frameworks shape the fields of human-computer interaction, cognitive science, and Ubicomp. Rogers has been instrumental in promulgating new theories, alternative methodologies, and far-reaching research agendas (e.g. “Being Human: HCI in 2020” manifesto).

Yvonne Rogers with Helen Sharp (center) and Jennifer Preece (right) at their book party at the ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems in Vancouver, BC, Canada in 2011.
Yvonne Rogers with Helen Sharp (center) and Jennifer Preece (right) at their book party at the ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems in Vancouver, BC, Canada in 2011.

Colleagues in the field of HCI recognize Rogers for her wide range of contributions to the field, from her Ph.D. work on iconic interfaces to her recent work on public displays and behavioral change. She has also developed several influential theoretical frameworks, including external cognition, and pioneered an approach to innovation and ubiquitous learning.

From 2000 to 2007, Rogers contributed to the UK Equator Project as a principal investigator. The interdisciplinary research collaboration aimed to explore the relationship between the physical and the digital for a range of user experiences, including playing and learning. Part of the project involved a study called Ambient Wood, which encouraged children to explore biological processes in a forest using wirelessly-connected probing devices. The researchers noted that the children readily learned and began to use the new technology to explore the woods in collaborative, imaginative ways.

Brad Myers presents Rogers with her award as a newly-elected member of the CHI Academy at the ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems in May 2012 in Austin, TX.
Brad Myers presents Rogers with her award as a newly-elected member of the CHI Academy at the ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems in May 2012 in Austin, TX.

Rogers has authored or contributed to more than 250 publications, including the bestselling textbook “Interaction Design; Beyond Human-Computer Interaction,” which has sold more than 150,000 copies worldwide and has been translated into six languages. She has served on various conference committees and advisory boards and is a Fellow of the British Computer Society.  She was also awarded a prestigious EPSRC dream fellowship concerned with rethinking the relationship between aging, computing, and creativity. SIGCHI elected Rogers to the CHI Academy in 2012.

“The best word for Yvonne is ‘sharp’ in her thinking.  She pushes me and others to think more deeply, shows fresh ways of looking at problems, and writes with compelling clarity about the latest directions and theories in HCI.  Her participation in the Rogers, Sharp & Preece book (‘Beyond Interaction’) helped make it one of the most widely used HCI textbooks.” – Ben Shneiderman

Rogers with Helen Sharp (left) and Jennifer Preece (right) at the ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems in April 2002 in Minneapolis, MN.
Rogers with Helen Sharp (left) and Jennifer Preece (right) at the ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems in April 2002 in Minneapolis, MN.

Education:

  • Ph.D. in Human-Computer Interaction, University of Wales (1988)
  • M.S. Ergonomics, University College London (1983)
  • B.A. in Psychology, University of Wales (1982)

Affiliations:

  • Professor of HCI, Computing Department, Open University (2006 – 2011)
  • Professor in Informatics, Indiana University (2003 – 2006)
  • Professor, School of Cognitive and Computing Sciences, Sussex University (1992 – 2003)

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